Training Journal: Classes with Judith Leibowitz #5

November 4, 1977: "In bending, breathing is a support to the body, especially in the lower back. The widening back makes space for the breath and supports the arms.

Bending and picking up an object:

squatting child.jpg
  • Torso lengthening and widening
  • Stance appropriately wide to height of person
  • Releasing into monkey with no goal in mind
  • Maintaining shoulder width against gravity's tendency to pull shoulders in as torso bends, releasing shoulders out without contracting in the back
  • Arms and elbows releasing out, hands go under object to lift
  • Attention is to your own process and direction. You can leave or pick up object without a significant change in your directions and stance
  • Lifting is accomplished by standing up out of a bend

Kinesthetic feelings are not a reliable guide to postural situations. The feelings tend to reinforce what we have already done and known. Alexander Technique takes you into the unknown where you need to go beyond familiar feelings."

Idelle Packer, MS, PT, mAmSAT, certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, has been creatively exploring its broad application for over 35 years. In her private practice, Body Sense, in Asheville, NC, she teaches the Alexander Technique in context of physical therapy assessment and rehabilitation. She authored the chapter on the Alexander Technique in Springer Publishers’ Encyclopedia of Complementary Health Practices (1999). Her current passion is Contact Improvisation, a somatic and athletic improvisation form, to which she has been joyfully integrating the principles of the Technique over the past fifteen years.

Idelle Packer.png

Idelle Packer, MS, PT, mAmSAT, certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, has been creatively exploring its broad application for over 35 years. In her private practice, Body Sense, in Asheville, NC, she teaches the Alexander Technique in context of physical therapy assessment and rehabilitation. She authored the chapter on the Alexander Technique in Springer Publishers’ Encyclopedia of Complementary Health Practices (1999). Her current passion is Contact Improvisation, a somatic and athletic improvisation form, to which she has been joyfully integrating the principles of the Technique over the past fifteen years.